Test your hearing damage online

Take the test

You don’t have to be exposed to an extremely loud noise for a very long period of time to experience hearing damage or loss. Any exposure to sounds at or above 85 decibels can cause damage. Knowing that a blender can easily reach up to 90 decibels you’re way faster over that decibel limit than you might think.

This test helps you determine whether you could benefit from an extensive, professional evaluation of your hearing, carried out by an audiologist or hearing care professional.

Taking the test

Do you have any hearing damage?

Let’s find out with the test below. We recommend using headphones instead of earbuds and a quiet room. Once you start hearing a high pitch you can stop the test and find out what happened. No cheating!

Congrats, if you got a decent score, now let’s make sure you keep it that way. If not, it may be time for some damage control.

What just happened?

Are you like me, one of the cool kids on the block who doesn’t shy away from a long night of epic partying? You will encounter sound, noise and music. Ow. What the Heck, if you don’t party, you’ll encounter those too. Who am I kidding?

Good vibrations

You probably heard the part of hearing damage quadrillion times so I’ll keep it as short and simple as possible.

Sound waves are travelling vibrations, these vibrations move through matter or space such as air water and so on. Sound doesn’t move through a vacuum because there are no atoms in a vacuum or void that can vibrate.

Very very technical

Sound vibrations move in longitudinal waves and strikes the eardrum. Here the vibrations get amplified by three bones (the auditory ossicles) on through the basilar membrane on a fluid filled part.

This fluid will cause very tiny hair cells around 20 000 of them to move in the ear. The moves of the microscopic hair cells send electrical impulses to the brain, which interpret it as sound.

When you suffer from tinnitus or Disco deafness (sorry, it isn’t as cool as it sounds), the unrepairable broken hair cells often are the reason.

Let’s get loud… but not too loud

Exposure to loud noise for a long time will damage the ear. That’s a cold fact.
For every added 3 dB, the pressure on your eardrums doubles. Sound under 75 dB is safe. When we crank up the volume from here we should be cautious.

When we take this in to account we can do some math:

dB Is it safe?
75 safe city noise
80 16 hours crossing train, alarm clock
85 8 hours yelling, mp3 player, truck
88 4 hours heavy truck
91 2 hours club , concert, mp3 player
94 1 hour club , concert, mp3 player
97 30 min club, concert, cinema, mp3 player
100 15 min club, concert, cinema, mp3 player

Happy Hertz

Decibels are about the volume of sound and Hertz is about the frequency of the waves, high or low tones. An average person can hear sound ranging from 20 Hz or 20 cycles per second to 20.000 Hz. As people get older the ears won’t be able to hear high pitch sound. Listening to high pitch sound for too long is once again not very smart.

Take Away

The most important take away here, is that preventing exposure to loud sounds or high pitch sound is basically the only option. Once damaged there is no ctrl+z. Give your ears some rest from time to time.

TL;DR Do to the test, party hard but responsible and just beat it or enjoy the silence.

Let’s take a second test

Answer each question with the option that fits you best and add all the correlated points up to one final total.

1. Do you have trouble understanding all the words in a conversation?

  • Never (0 points)
  • Rarely (1 point)
  • Sometimes (2 points)
  • Often (3 points)
  • Always (4 points)

2. Do you have trouble hearing when your back is turned to the speaker?

  • Never (0 points)
  • Rarely (1 point)
  • Sometimes (2 points)
  • Often (3 points)
  • Always (4 points)

3. Do you have difficulty following a conversation in a large group or crowd?

  • Never (0 points)
  • Rarely (1 point)
  • Sometimes (2 points)
  • Often (3 points)
  • Always (4 points)

4. Do you think other people mumble?

  • Never (0 points)
  • Rarely (1 point)
  • Sometimes (2 points)
  • Often (3 points)
  • Always (4 points)

5. Do you ask people to repeat themselves?

  • Never (0 points)
  • Rarely (1 point)
  • Sometimes (2 points)
  • Often (3 points)
  • Always (4 points)

6. Do you find telephone conversation increasingly difficult?

  • Never (0 points)
  • Rarely (1 point)
  • Sometimes (2 points)
  • Often (3 points)
  • Always (4points)

7. Do people ever tell you that … ?

  • You speak loudly (2 points)
  • You speak softly (0 points)

8. Do your family or friends complain that you play your music or TV too loudly?

  • Never (0 points)
  • Rarely (1 point)
  • Sometimes (2 points)
  • Often (3 points)
  • Always (4 points)

9. How often do you go out? (Club, bar,…)

  • Never (0 points)
  • Once every 3 months (1 point)
  • Once a month (2 points)
  • Once a week (3 points)
  • Multiple times a week (4 points)
  • Everyday (5 points)

10. How often do you experience ringing in your ear?

  • Never (0 points)
  • Rarely (1 point)
  • Sometimes (2 points)
  • Every time I go out (3 points)
  • Longer periods of time (4 points)
  • Always (5 points)

Add the points of the ten answers that describe you best. This total score correlates with one of these three categories.

The results

0-13 Dance the night away

Hearing test score 1

You ears are pretty ok, so please keep them that way. You can do so by limiting exposure to noisy activities at home, at work and especially when you go out.

Wear ear protection, such as earplugs or earmuffs, when you go out to festivals, concerts, clubs, bars and so on. Good earplugs will reduce sound while at the same time music and speech remains clear. Check our comparison of different earplugs here.

14-26 Watch out while going out

Hearing test Score 2

Your hearing might be at risk. An evaluation of your hearing, carried out by an audiologist or hearing care professional can clarify that. Try limiting exposure to noisy activities at home, at work and especially when you go out.

Wear earplugs or earmuffs whenever you go out partying. Whether it’s to a festival, club, concert or bar. Good earplugs will reduce sound . At the same time music and speech remains clear, saving you from hearing damage. Check our comparison of different earplugs here.

27- 40 Get your ears tested

Get your ears tested

Your hearing is definitely not as it should be. We advise you to get an in-depth hearing test at a local audiologist or hearing care professional. Especially if you experience some discomfort, hearing loss or when you struggle with ringing in your ear.

Wondering what that ringing noise is and if it will ever stop? Read our article on tinnitus!

All Gif’s by ©Giphy

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here